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Get the Best out of PowerPoint and Presentations using Visualbee You must already know by now, how beneficial Visualbee can be when it comes to making high-impact presentations. Here is a short guide to tell you how you can make the best out of your presentation using Visualbee:

Make images fit the Slides:

Using good imagery in your presentation is one of the best moves you can make to get the best out of a presentation. In the case of using a portrait layout of a picture on a landscape oriented slide, the image looks rather out of place surrounded by the slide design theme. One simple trick that Visualbee uses is to change the colour of the slide background to black. When you make the slide background black, the picture seems to be floating on screen. Visualbee knows just how to enhance your slides with pictures.

Avoid using Moving Text on Your Slides:

Try not to use moving text on PowerPoint slides. Well, as much as you might like the ability for your important points to zoom in, or spiral onto the slide, not only is this distracting away from your message, but these "special features" eat into your time. Leave the fancy text manoeuvrings. Visualbee understands this very well and thus instead of messing with your text, it enhances your presentation using unique design templates and other graphics.

Use Slide Master:

Make global changes in slide master. If you are new to PowerPoint, or even a seasoned presenter, look into the use of the slide master to speed up the creation stage of making a presentation. The slide master contains all the features that are at work behind the scenes. By making a change once in the slide master, you don't have to do this same thing individually on each slide. Slide master helps change the font style, colour and size for all slides, add a company logo so that it appears on all slides, change the location of the text placeholders, etc. 

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7 Tips for Engaging Your Audience

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7 Tips for Engaging Your Audience Without the interest and attention of your audience, you cannot accomplish your objective of having a successful presentation. Audience attention and interest naturally drops during a presentation. It is greatest at the beginning and end of a presentation. How far the attention drops depends on the skills of the presenter. The challenge for presenters is to continue to engage and re-engage attention and interest throughout the presentation.

Following are seven techniques presenters use to engage the emotions and learning state of their audience members:

1. Audience Preparation:

By exposing the audience to the material prior to the learning event, assimilation, thinking and recall time are all dramatically increased.

2. Posture and Movement:

Standing increases heartbeats by 10 extra times per minute. That sends more blood to the brain, which actives the central nervous system to increase neural firing. When the audience finds their energy level dropping, get them to stand up for 2 - 3 minutes as an energizer.

3. Repetition:

We learn through repetition. Habits, beliefs, values and self-image have been learned through repetition. Skilful presenters use the technique of repeating key points throughout their presentation. A skilful presenter looks for creative ways to revisit the same point.

4. Use Threes:

People remember the points in your presentation better if you speak in threes.

Consider such well-known phrases:

- Duty, God and Country

- Faith, Hope and Love

- Up, Up and Away

Something increases in the rhythm, meter and power if we use threes.

5. Inside Scoop:

You've got their immediate attention if you can give them the inside scoop on something, particularly when it hits close-to-home. Know your audience!! Show them that they are receiving the most recent, relevant information available on the subject.

6. Analogies and Metaphors:

Analogies and metaphors saturate into our lives. Advertising uses analogies and metaphors to get attention and further understanding. Analogies and metaphors can be single words or expressions. The more complex your subject, the more important it is to use analogies and metaphors.

7. Storytelling:

You can get your point across in less time, with better understanding and with longer retention if you state those using stories. Stories are so effective that people will sometimes remember them forever. 

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How To Make Technical Presentations Interesting?

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Start analogy:

The most useful thing you can do when you start putting together a presentation is to reach for slide ware. Use a paper notebook to brainstorm my ideas with multi-coloured pens, and then scan it so you can refer back to it quickly when putting the slides together.

Mind-mapping a talk:

Don't create slides linearly.  Focus on an idea in the brainstorm that surprises you the most and use it as a jump-off point for creating slides. The initial idea helps set the tone for the rest of the presentation.

Be thorough:

Shortcuts are obvious to your audience. But every minute you put into the preparation pays off. So remember to be thorough with your speech and content and everything.

Tailor your content:

It's okay to give the same speech at multiple conferences, but make sure you alter the content so it's relevant to your audience.

Practice makes man perfect:

Know the timing of your speech and presentation. Work out what the average time you should spend on each slide. Don't wait until you've finished the presentation before you start practicing.

Consistency and Harmony is necessary:

Use a consistent background and colour scheme throughout the presentation. Use modules to segment the presentation. Use common graphic and colour symbolism to avoid confusion. Make sure you keep all major graphic elements consistent. Use only one font family in your presentation.

For an experimental talk, you don't just want to communicate raw data but you want to show relationships. Tables, charts and graphs give you an opportunity to show these relationships graphically which are easier to explain and comprehend. But these graphs should be accurate and comprehensible. Keep graphs simple. The audience should be able to absorb your ideas at a glance. If you show too many bars, slices, or lines, the audience will be forced to spend excess time deciphering data.

 

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Staring at the glow of your blank computer screen with no idea on how to open or start your presentation? We’ve all struggled with the best ways to open a presentation. But don’t worry, Visualbee is here to guide you through this problem. Here are 5 powerful ways to open a presentation:

Silence is Gold:

Most people won’t be able to pull this off very easily but during your next presentation, try to opt for silence. Speak a few words and then be quiet. Say a few more words then be quiet again. It is a very quick and easy way to own the room. But do remember to hold your composure.

Steer attention towards the Future or Past:

Use two simple statements:

-Prospective (looking to the future): “30 Years from now, your job won’t exist.”

-Retrospective (looking to the past): “In 1970, Japan owned 9% of the market. Today, they own 37%.”

The reality is that looking into the future or past always sparks engagement.

Quote a famous quote:

The easiest way to open a high impact presentation is simply to quote someone. Think about that last presenter you heard when they opened their presentation with a quote from Albert Einstein or Napoleon. A quote equals instant credibility.

Share Something Extraordinary:

Share an extraordinary story with the audience to generate interest. Engage your audience with a unique and interesting story.

Tell a Story

Here’s the amazing thing about presentations: If your presentation is based only on facts and statistics then your audience is going to react in one of two ways: 1) agree or 2) disagree. However, if you tell a story, your audience will interact with you. 

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Master Presentation Tips From Visualbee

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While Visualbee is a great tool to get your presentation to look good in no time, you've got to take your presentations to the next level with these tips. 

Try to have only one point per slide. One or two strong graphic images or a succinct line of text will tell the story better than bullet points, or long paragraph of copy, complex graphics or charts. The audience needs to process what you're saying while at the same time absorbing your slide on the screen. So, rather than one complex slide, instead break it up into multiple slides, each with one main idea. This idea could be represented by a strong image, short phrases or data point.

Make sure you provide enough contrast between your content and the background. A simple background with solid color is best so it won't be distracting or overpowering and drown out your text or main image. The text should also be large enough to see from the back of the room.

Use strong visuals to support your message. Half of our brains are wired to process visual information. Like the old saying goes "a picture is worth a thousand words". So, instead of putting on the words on the slide, move them to the speaker note area or print handouts and instead find a strong image that captures the essence of your message and show that image instead. Otherwise, we tend to read ahead of the speaker and not fully pay attention to what he/she is saying. Use a photo to emotionally connect with the audience, engage them in a total immersive experience.

Always use high quality graphics either custom illustrations (think infographic type of imagery), or photos shot yourself or perhaps purchased professional stock photos (for example through either iStockphoto or ShutterStock). Don't just download an image from some website (beware of copyright issues) and then just stretch a small, low-resolution photo to make it fit your design causing the photo to show pixelation and lose its integrity. Our designers often use lifestyle images of people on the slides we designed for our clients, they tend to help connect with the audience on a more personal and emotional level.

Color evokes emotion...it helps persuade and motivate. Appropriate color usage can increase interest and improve comprehension and retention. Use your approved brand colors to help establish connection with your brand. Use cool colors (blue or green) in the background and warm colors (orange or red) in the foregrounds to make them pop. If you're presenting in a dark and large room, a dark background with light text (white or yellow) will work best. However, if you're presenting in a well lit room, then a light background with dark text should work better (dark background with light text tend to washout in a bright room).

Custom Designed Presentation: Design your own theme and templates, don't just use the standard templates included in PowerPoint. You want your presentation to represent your brand and professional image. Besides your audience expects a unique presentation, not cookie-cutter slides. Professional designed templates are available online or you can find well a qualified presentation company to help with your presentation. There're many great presentation companies out there so choose carefully and be sure to review samples of their past work. Remember, you only have one chance to make one great first impression.

Opening Intro or Animation: Use a short video or animation to engage your audience and get them excited about your presentation. It can be 20-60 seconds long and shouldn't be more than 2-3 minutes. Think of it as a movie teaser to pique the audience interest. You can create the animation in Flash and then insert it into to your PowerPoint presentation. Be sure to add appropriate scripts to help it auto-rewind and refresh the screen.

You can also add a Flash movie to your interior slides to help explain or convey a concept. See how we add interactive navigation menu on the right in our client's slide below to help bring up Google Earth video showing our client's plant location in various cities around the world.

We hope these tips are helpful with your next presentation. If you ever need any help with your preparing a presentation for your next important meeting, our presentation design team will be glad to help. You can check out our presentation design and development services here.

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Add YouTube videos in your presentation

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A successful PowerPoint presentation does not just consist of good content and images. To make your presentation stand out from the rest, one can add the zing required in slides by simply adding videos to your presentation. They not only make your presentation more lively but also unique.

Saw a useful video on YouTube but don’t know how to insert it in your presentation? Don’t worry; Visualbee is here to help you out. Here is a short guide to help you insert videos in your presentation.

Now, you can add youtube videos to your powerpoint presentation. Just follow the following steps and you can easily make your presentations even more interesting with youtube videos.

  1. First, decide on a good video which is appropriate for the content of your presentation. Choosing a good quality and suitable video is very important. Then, click on the share button present below the video.
  2. After you do this, click on the embed option and a code appears on your screen. Simply copy this code. You will have to paste this code in your PowerPoint presentation slide later.
  3. Leave this aside, and open Microsoft PowerPoint.
  4. In the insert menu, click on the video option.
  5. After you do this, a pop-up appears where you have to input the embedded code.  Paste the copied code in this box and click on insert.
  6. The video has now been inserted on your slide.
  7. You can now resize and reposition the video according to your need.
  8. And there you have a PowerPoint presentation with not just plain content and pictures, but also helpful videos. So, follow the following steps and create a high-impact presentation.
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Benefits of Automated Presentation Design

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Automated presentation designs are a boon for people who have to deliver presentations every other day.

Whether it is teachers, college professors, businessmen or advertisers, they all need presentations to wow their audience and generate interest. There are thousands of things one has to consider while delivering a presentation and automated presentations take the burden of having a good presentation design off your shoulders.

VisualBee is one of the power tools that uses your content and unique free PowerPoint templates along with appropriate graphics to create an effective PowerPoint presentation. The concept of automated presentation design has way more benefits than detriments.

To begin with it gives you time to concentrate on your presentation speech and other things instead of your presentation slides. With the help of automated presentation design, one can easily have a creditable presentation with all their desired content along with a presentable design.

Secondly, it saves your time and is very beneficial for last minute presentations. You just out in the content and Visualbee takes care of the rest. It includes unique PowerPoint templates in your presentation along with eye-catching graphics which interest the audience. Automated presentation design can turn a dull and ordinary presentation into something unique and new.

Hassle free and easy! Yes, for real. All you have to do is download Visualbee and your future presentation worries are our worries. Just remember to use limited content on each slide so that the audience can clearly read and understand your points. We will add useful pictures and other graphics in the presentation which complements your content.

Automated presentation designs such as the ones used by Visualbee give your presentation a professional and classy look. Neither do they make your presentation look too flashy and childish nor too dreary. The design templates used are the correct combination of professional and outstanding.

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How to Organize your Presentations

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Tools like Visualbee can help you gain an edge in your once bland presentations, but good design needs to be taken to the next level in terms of organisation. The audience processes your speech and ideas more easily if you lay down a well-defined organizational pattern: an introduction, body, and conclusion sections, each with clear transitions. When organising your speech, think how well it suits your purpose, audience, and constraints such as the occasion, time limit, and venue.

Introduction:

Your introduction should grab the audience’s attention in the first few minutes. Use lurid language, imagery, and interesting facts to keep your spectators interested, but exercise caution when using humour since it can backfire too. For your opening, you could cite a startling statistic, pose an open-ended question, tell a story or relate your topic to the audience to establish common ground. Clearly state the main idea or thesis of the speech. As a transition, preview points you will mention in the body of the speech. This preview will tell the audience that the end of the introduction is near and the body of the speech is about to commence.

Body:

The body of your speech is where you present your main points. Each main point should be supported by information or research. You can use examples, narratives, testimony, facts, or statistics, etc. Several common and useful patterns can help you organize your main points. Choose a pattern that suits your purpose, your audience’s needs, and your specific speaking situation. Show the audience that there is a need for change and that the situation at hand is dire by using statistics, examples, testimony, etc. Do offer a detailed solution to the problem you just presented. Help the audience visualize the advantages of your proposed solution.

Conclusion:

In your conclusion, review the main points and the basic idea of the speech. End with a note of finality and challenge the audience to respond and think about your ideas. Do keep in mind that your conclusion should not be too long.

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Top 8 Presentation Strategies

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Our team at Visualbee wanted to leave you with some handy tips to help you ace that presentation. We know that if you're using Visualbe you've got your presentation design taken care of. These tips will address the rest of the things you need to consider

1. Prepare…Always! Lack-of-preparation is the kiss of death for being able to deliver a killer presentation. People who prepare the night before and then wonder why their presentation was a flop, need to rethink. Just because you know your topic, doesn’t mean you can just wing it (successfully). Map out your entire presentation and take time to add in interesting things into the PowerPoint (video clips, cartoons, pics, etc.). Practice to know your flow and timing!

2. Don’t Read. Always present with a notes outline, but don’t “read” it. Use it to refer to and have the main “content” in your head. You don’t want your back to the audience while you’re busy reading out the facts - it will be boring and distracting for the audience.

3. Smile. It makes people immediately feel at ease. Ou could do without fake smiles ­ but a nice, honest, pleasant smile. Smile a lot during your presentation. People will react warmly (most people) and you will build a nice rapport quickly.

4. If you get “I’m bored” signals from your audience, DO SOMETHING! Don’t just break a nervous sweat and continue babbling on. Ask a question! Take a break! Get more animated! Increase your energy level! Speak a little more loudly! Ask a trivia question and give a prize! This is why it is SO IMPORTANT to be “dialed-in” to your audience (even if it’s one person) instead of being “all about you” and your presentation. Every presentation you do is about THEM, not you.

5. Use humor. In Ed McMahon’s book, Superselling, he states facts when it comes to sales:

We tend to buy from someone we trust; We tend to trust someone we like; We tend to trust someone who makes us laugh.

His overall conclusion? You can be a more effective and successful presenter by using humor in your presentations. Try to have some funny short stories or one-liners that pertain to the presentation…something to break the monotony!

If you are not a naturally “witty, funny” person, this will take some work, but don’t panic! Simply consider hiring someone for a few hours to help you improve your presentation with some “fun” visuals (cartoons or video clips) or verbal communication. This person doesn’t have to be a comedy writer, but perhaps employees, friends, family, etc. A few simple, funny elements or comments can go a long way! The top sales trainers and presentation pros recommend it, so consider it!

6. Always let people know at the beginning of the presentations the steps you’ll be taking them through. Example: “Today we’re going to discuss 3 steps to help you build your brand. Each step will have an exercise that you’ll do as a group, and after each one we’ll have a discussion, followed by a 5-minute break. Then the last 30-minutes of the workshop will be for Q & A.” This is a good tactic to immediately establish “control” of the presentation (which you want) and to set audience expectations.

7. Create a Great Slide Deck: Studies done by major University’s have proven that people who use colorful, impressive visuals (don’t overdue it!) in their presentations are more likely to get favorable results. Don’t know how or don’t have the talent? Hire a graphic designer for a few hours to help you. For a minimal amount, you can have a great looking PPT presentation…that you can keep using!

8. Have all your electronic accessories prepared and tested. If you present using PowerPoint and will use your own laptop (and projector) make sure your computer is charged and that you have several extension cords of different lengths (for the computer AND projector).

There have been many people who couldn’t do their presentations (effectively) because their computer wasn’t charged, or their laptop power cord(s) was too short to reach the outlets, or the cord was too short to run the projector.

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Top 5 Tips To Plan Your Presentation

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#1 Pick Your Topic:

Selecting a topic is the most crucial step of presentation planning process. The list of topics you can choose from is never-ending. Remember that the topics should be age-appropriate and in good taste.  Choose a topic that fits your knowledge and skill level. If it’s your first time giving a presentation, it is best to pick a topic with which you are familiar. If you are an experienced presenter, then try challenging yourself. Explore a new kind of topic and try to grow and learn.

#2 Gather Information:

After deciding on a topic, do some research and gather information about your topic. Try to learn as much as possible about your topic. The more you know, the more confident you will be when you are giving the presentation and the easier it will be to answer questions.  You can acquire information from several different sources including books, newspapers, internet, etc. Information you gather should be recent and accurate. The most important thing is to gather complete information and to know the source of your information.

#3 Outline your presentation:

 There are many ways of preparing what you will include in your speech. Some people only use outlines, but write out their introduction and conclusion. You should experiment to determine what works best for you. Whichever method you use, start with forming an outline. List the important points you want to state and arrange them in a logical order. Under each main heading, list the details you need to cover.

#4 Play with Visual Aids:

 Visuals can be of various kinds: actual objects, posters, videos, charts, slides, etc. If you are presenting a demonstration, you must have at least one visual aid. Visual aids are used to enhance your presentation. They can add spark to your presentation and help keep the audience’s interest alive. They can help the audience learn faster, understand better, and remember longer. Make sure your visual aid has a purpose and that it is easy to use or show. Visual aids should not overpower your presentation. They should simply reinforce what you are saying.

#5 Practice:

 No matter how much time you spend on all the other steps in planning a presentation, nothing takes the place of practicing. The more you practice, the more comfortable and confident you will be while giving your speech. When you practice, you need to talk out loud, not just in your head. Get in the habit of using complete sentences. Practice the whole presentation at once. This will allow you to see if everything goes smoothly together.

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Presentation Strategies That Work For You

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They say everyone has their own style. This holds especially true in case of presentations. While Visualbee can take care of how your slides look, its important to know how you’re going to go about presenting them.

It's important to realize delivering effective presentations is dependent upon not only how good you are at transferring information but how successful you are in influencing, inspiring and making what you say memorable and actionable for the client or prospect.

However if you’ve noticed that when you speak to clients they not only look at their watches but shake them during one of your presentations, it’s time to consider the following strategies for delivering effective presentations and engage their hearts and minds.

1. Consider your listener

Frame the presentation as though you were the one sitting in the audience. Effective presentations should be targeted to meet the specific needs, wants and emotions of your audience. You risk losing their interest and focus after just two minutes if there is no relevance to their financial, emotional or physical well-being.

2. Ensure your audience knows what's in it for them

And if the answer is not much, you may as well pack up and leave before you bore them to snores.

Want more articles like this? Check out the  presentation skills section.

3. Begin with the end in mind

Let them know what to expect, how they can use the information and the direct benefits to them. People buy benefits and outcomes, not promises and generalities that bear no relevance to their lives. So begin with the end in mind and tailor your presentations to the needs of the audience or customer you are speaking to.

Now your content is prepared you can look more closely at your delivery.

4. Speak as if to one individual

Deliver your speech as though each person was the only one in the room and you were speaking directly to them. Make the presentation personal and consistent with why they have come to listen to you in the first place. If you are an expert in the topic give them assurance that by the time they will leave the presentation they will have a greater understanding and knowledge and will be able to apply the information given.

5.Practise your presentation style

Be aware that your delivery will utilise three different styles namely audio, visual and kinesthetic (hands-on). How do you move between them?

To know for sure, it pays to practise. One method is to organise a video recorder and tape your prepared presentation. Then show it to your partner, children and/ or trusted friends. Ask for their honest and constructive comments about style and delivery.

You may need to brace yourself for their feedback! However it is worth taking on board. Others' perspectives can help you dramatically improve your delivery and so increase your chances of winning over your 'real' audience.

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Making presentations is not just about the images that you add or the colors that you use. Those are a platform, but what matter is how you deliver. While Visualbee allows you to ease the process of making your presentation look good; we wanted to leave you with thoughts on delivery by former Ogilvy CEO Kenneth Roman and legendary adman Joel Raphaelson.

According to them, organizing a presentation is a combination of clear thinking (the pyramid principle, for example) and clear communications (points that follow here).

The setting is most likely a conference room. It’s a business environment. Everything you say, everything you show, every device you use, must move you toward your objectives in a businesslike fashion.

Keep things simple — keep them on target

Start with specific, written objectives — and a strategy. You need a theme to give your presentation unity and direction, and to fix your purpose in your audience’s mind. Make it a simple theme, easy to remember, and open with it, using a headline to state it.

Tie every element in your presentation to the theme. If you’re using charts, put your theme all by itself on one chart and place it where it will be visible throughout the presentation. This keeps the people in your audience — sometimes sleepy, often distracted, always with lots on their minds — focused on your theme (and message).

Tell your audience where you’re going

Show an agenda that lists the points you are going to cover. Describe the structure of your presentation, and say how long it will take. Estimate time conservatively — err on the long side rather than the short side. A presentation that is promised for twenty minutes and goes twenty-five seems like an eternity. The same thing promised for thirty minutes seems short in twenty-five, crisp and businesslike.

Throughout the meeting, refer to the agenda to keep your audience on track. Prepare a presentation book the audience can keep, and tell them at the start that you’ll give them copies after the meeting. This will relieve them from taking voluminous notes (instead of listening), so you’ll get their full attention. Do everything that’s been asked — and a little more. Be precise and complete in covering what was requested. If you cannot cover some point or other, say so and say why.

Think headlines, not labels

Presenters often have impressive data on their charts, but fail to extract what the data shows, so the audience doesn’t understand what the numbers prove. What does your data say? Headings on charts should tell the audience how to think about the numbers. … Use headings to establish your main points. Guide the audience by numbering them on charts or slides, telling people how many you have.

Involve the audience

Look for interesting visual devices to present dry, routine materials. A little creativity goes a long way. New computer programs make it easy to do colorful things with pie charts and bar charts. Newsmagazines hire top artists to make their charts interesting and clear. USA Today is particularly adept at charts, and runs at least one every day in the lower left-hand corner of the front page. Study the techniques of these publications — and borrow from them.

Think of ways to involve your audience. Play games with them. Invite people to guess the answers to questions, or to predict the results of research — before you reveal them.

Try to add something extra, something unexpected. It demonstrates more than routine interest. You might play tape recordings of customers describing your audience’s product, or quote a relevant passage from a speech your audience’s chief executive made years ago, or show an excerpt from yesterday’s TV news that illuminates or reinforces an important point.

Finish strong

‘Oh, give me something to remember you by’ goes the song. As soon as you’ve gone, your audience is likely to turn its attention to other things — perhaps to presentations competitive to yours. Leave something to remember you by.

Don’t let a meeting drift off into trivia. Close with a summary and a strong restatement of your proposition or recommendation. For major presentations, look for a memorable, dramatic close — something visual, perhaps a small gift that symbolizes your main point.

Keep your promise about how much time you’ll take. Running longer than you said you would at the outset shows a lack of discipline.

Presenters often sprout wings and fly when confronted with an audience. They expand, tell anecdotes — and hate to sit down. If what you’ve written is exactly on time in rehearsal, you’ll probably run over in performance. If you’ve been allotted twenty minutes, write for fifteen.

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Examples of Great Presentation Design Part 6

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Previously, in this article franchise, we presented some great presentations designed so as it become a huge success among their viewers. In the sixth part of this series, Visualbee brings to you some more such examples to help you create remarkable and appraise worthy presentations by just the magic of good imagery:

20 rules for selling ideas to your boss:

Here is an example of a presentation which has a great amalgam of text and images. It provides useful tips about selling your ideas to your boss in a very humorous and light-hearted manner. The images are very well-attached like in Visualbee which makes your simple presentation very effective.

This is how you get attention:

Yet another great presentation created by Bruce Kasanoff.  Through a very clear, credible and compelling presentation he gives out the message that it is better to be an expert than say you are one. The pictures indicate very good ideas and story. The presentation is very creative both in pictures as well as storyline.

Theory of Seven:

The presentation has a good theme and it has easily understandable slides with relevant pictures. Good pictures and imagery is the key to success for creating a good presentation. With a theme of how and why to explain everything so even a seven-year-old can understand, this presentation does not fail to grab the audience’s attention.

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Visualbee is a very powerful tool available to create and design high impact and remarkable presentations. The credibility of Visualbee is unquestionable but a certain question often arises in people’s mind: why they should Visualbee? There are many reasons for you to consider using Visualbee for your presentations. A few of them are listed below:

It lightens up a plain boring presentation by using attractive yet professional looking design templates. The design templates it uses are nor too flashy not too plain. They give a classy touch to your presentation.

It minimizes your efforts of adding images to your presentation as it does so itself. It adds appropriate images to your presentation which add zing to it. The images Visualbee uses complement the text you use in your slides.

All you have to focus on is your text. You add the text; we add high impact visuals which leave your audience impressed. The only work you have to put in your slides is cautiously using limited text.

It takes the burden of making a good PowerPoint presentation of your shoulder and gives you a good opportunity to focus on your presentation delivery without being worried about the slides. You get ample time to practise your speech, your presentation, etc as it already takes care of your slides which play a major role in a successful presentation.

It is probably the best way to make a PowerPoint presentation because this tool is nothing less than a professional designer. Sometimes people try to reach professional PowerPoint designers to make good presentations, but when you use Visualbee, you don’t need to do so. Visualbee is probably the best presentation designer you need.

But it is always better to try something to actually be sure about what it is offering. So, try using Visualbee once and you will never use any other tools for creating PowerPoint presentation. It is the one solution to all your PowerPoint presentation problems. So use it yourself to see the change it brings in your slides.

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Problem #1: Copying images from websites:

Besides the obvious copyright issues, this is almost always a bad idea. It will lower the quality of image to make the file size as small as possible. Thus, when you place this image in your presentation it will not be large enough, so you will stretch it out. As these are raster images, when you enlarge them you will literally pull the image apart.

To fix this: Microsoft makes a large amount of images and clip art available for your use for free, and it’s easy to use. These are usually in a .wmf file format, which is a vector image. Just go to the main menu, and select ‘Insert -> Clip art‘, and if you have an Internet connection you can download any image you want. If you’re looking for something that will set your presentation above the rest there is a very big list of places to get free stock photos.

Problem#2: Losing control your audience:

One of these things is likely to happen when you give your presentation. Either no one will participate. This is the most common one, but it’s not the end of the world.

To fix this: Stay relaxed and confident, pick a couple of people that seem interested and ask a couple of questions. At times this is all it takes to lighten things up a bit.

Or your audience gets engaged and wants to participate. This is good, but you still need to stay in control.

To do this: Keep the conversation to the point. If someone asks you a question that’s not related to the topic ask him to discuss it after the presentation. Stay aware of side conversations, and bring those people back into the main conversation. Don’t be afraid to address members of your audience, either to get them to interact or to get them to pay attention. As long as you keep your temperament even and controlled you’ll be fine.

Problem#3: Fonts gone wrong:

There are times when you pick font sizes and colours that are either too small which is not readable or fonts that are too big and flashy. Or there might be some fonts missing from your computer system.

To fix this:  There are a couple of things you could do. The first is to stick to fonts that are common to most Windows computers. Arial, Times New Roman, Tahoma, and Verdana are some examples of fonts that most Windows computers have loaded. The second way is to tell PowerPoint to embed your fonts. This means that the fonts you use will travel with your presentation, and should eliminate the entire missing font problem.

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The key ingredient to a memorable slide presentation is presentation imagery. Thoughtful images never fail in keeping your audience engaged, reinforcing your professionalism, and making a lasting impression. But making your slides sizzle with the help of images takes more than just a pretty picture.

It’s best to spend a little time positioning and framing your images for high impact. This kind of creativity is essential when choosing images. Your audience and you too must have probably seen plenty of bad clip-art. The extensive use of PowerPoint clip art has set the bar low for slide design success and the monotonous use of images of businesspeople staring at computers makes standing apart from the crowd much easier. Being a little more inventive with your images will make you a hit.

Visualbee approaches your imagery in a clever and creative way, and look for illustrations that tell a story in a less obvious way.

Here are three of the slide design approaches for presentating images

Image Should Lead the Eye:

  • The imaginative placement of images keeps the audience engaged by compelling them away from the standard left-to-right reading pattern.
  • Place the image in the upper left corner of the slide
  • Choose a small image with a linear design element
  • Set the text so the design is pointing to it.

 

 

 

Use Unique Image Frames:

 

  • Adding a border is a common way to frame an image and making it more presentable. Here’s how you can do it:
  • Place 3 images on white rectangular “cards” and use a drop shadow.
  • Place the “cards” to the upper right 
  • Allow the very top of the images to bleed over the edge

 

 

 

 

 

Set the Slide Background as the Canvas: Plain white backgrounds with squared-off presentation images placed symmetrically have become out-dated now. Try this instead:

  • Pick a small image.
  • Set it to the right so the text is more prominent
  • Set the background to a complementary color and add a gradient texture.
  • Keep text to fewer than 10 words and use a contrasting font color.

 

 

 

 

Your pictures will be greatly enhanced.

Visualbee uses certain tricks and secrets like these to make add zing to your images, so your presentation turns out to be a big hit.

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Tools like Visualbee can go a long way in making your presentation look great, but there's only so much that looks can do. While getting the sensibility of your slides and associated imagery is important, you must also learnhow to plan and structure your presentation. Visualbee prescribes the below given points in order to organise your presentation for best results.

Step 1: Begin with your big message:

A big message is the main thing you want your audience to know about you and is the purpose of the presentation.  Commence with the big message to set you apart from other presenters and convince your audience you are there with them to share something important.

Step 2: Organize your content in 3 to 5 main topics:

If your PowerPoint presentation seems reasonable to the audience, they understand it better. So you need to organize your content in a coherent structure so it makes sense and organize into to 3 to 5 main topics for easier remembering and understanding. This way even if you talk really long and the audience forgets the details, they will still remember the main topics.

Step 3: Highlight your main ideas with visual illustrations:

We have mentioned again and again that pictures are always more memorable than words. When you need to use many words to explain one thing, it is better to use a picture to show what it is. If you are allowed to make the picture humorous, it will be even better. Visualbee highlights and supports your content with just the right pictures and designs.

Step 4:  Purge as much text as you can; your slides are a visual aid not a story book:

Good eye contact is the key of a successful PowerPoint presentation and one cannot maintain an eye contact with the audience if they are busy reading from the screen. Use only bullets and key words on your slides.

Step 5: Instead of printing the PowerPoint slides as handouts, create separate documents:

PowerPoint slides and documents have so many differences like backgrounds, fonts, etc. PowerPoint slides look good on screens but not on paper. It is better to create reader-friendly documents because people actually read them.

Step 6: Conclude your presentation by returning to your opening big message:

Once you are finished delivering content, repeat the big message you started with to remind your audience of the true purpose of the presentation. Also when you end where you began, your presentation has a flawless and satisfying quality of a good performance.

Step 7: Practice well before the presentation:

Practise can make your presentation look more professional. It is really difficult to do everything well at the first try. So practice some times and check you make good eye contact and speak conversationally. When you are practised, the presentation will seem more casual and easy going.

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While Visualbee can really help you add immense value to the design of your presentations, there are a number of other factors that go into making a high impact presentation. The below 6 points will help you focus on the right things. 

A big yet ideal idea:

Presenters usually spend too little time or no time at all thinking about what they want to say. Making a point or effectively conveying a message to your audience thinking and planning. To start your thinking process, research the topic you plan to present. This way you might find inspiring and solid statistics. After this try to consider your audience's needs and brainstorm ways to meet those needs.

Have a good presentation Structure:

After adjusting your presentation, build your presentation storyboard. Outline your presentation structure and think of the number of ways to present your information. Present your information as a story as this makes the whole process less daunting and stress-free.

Designing Slides:

For presentations, a very important rule is to present qualitative data with words and all quantitative data with numbers. Expressive charts make helpful visual guides for your presentations. Media like photos and videos are helpful visual elements in presentation. Try to avoid boring fonts like Arial, Calibri, and Times New Roman in your presentation and instead use standout fonts such as Lobster Two and Alternate Gothic No. 2.

Put yourself in their shoes:

You may be a bit nervous while giving a presentation in front of a huge crowd. Use this simple trick: Picture yourself as holding the same role as your audience. Make note of the similarities you share with them instead of focusing on the differences. Talking to co-workers will increase your comfort level and make your presentation seem more natural and easy-going.

Control your voice

When people get nervous, their voice sounds high-pitched and uncertain. Avoid this by speaking from your chest instead. Nervous people also rush their words when speaking. But people with expert opinions speak more slowly so that the audience can process what they have to say. 

Avoid unnecessary out the filler:

Filler words such as “um,” “like,” and “ah” are the kiss of death for a good presentation. If you feel you may stumble, take a brief pause and decide what you’re going to say. The pause makes you look more thoughtful. It also gives you time to properly visualize and express what you need to say.

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Visualbee's Dont's For a Great Presentation

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6 Secrets of Bad Presentations (and How to Avoid Them)

Being nervous about a presentation is pretty normal.

None of us want to deliver a bad presentation and we have all sat through enough horrible ones to know that it is possible.  Our worst nightmare is looking out into the audience and seeing a sea of glossed over eyes, people checking their cell phones and the rest counting ceiling tiles.

This doesn’t happen by accident, so don’t let this happen to you! While there are no universal formulas to delivering a presentation, aside from the tremendous amount of advice and angles to deliver a spectacular one, avoid the following at all costs.

Self Confidence

This one, more than any other, is attributed to lack of confidence and nervousness, but these statements are credibility killers. Unless you’re using those as a specific lead-in to what you’re going to say, your audience will have already pegged you as a mediocre presenter (at best). To get you through this crucial moment, take a deep breath in and just start your presentation.

Eye Contact

This is a great way to let your audience feel disconnected from you. Look at the back wall, the ceiling, your shoes a gaping void in the universe, or just anywhere that isn’t your audience.

Connecting with your audience requires you to at least look at them. Make eye-contact with a person for a few brief moments and then pick somebody else until you’ve made your rounds around the room. For the nervous types who hate making eye-contact, look at their foreheads.

Equipment Checks

Nothing kills the mood more than waiting twenty minutes for a presenter to work through their technical issues.

Get to the presentation room at least an hour before people arrive and make sure any equipment you’ll be using is in good working order. Make sure to plan for the worst and always have a backup plan! Technology has come a long way, but it’s still not 100% reliable when you need it to be.

Know Your Content

Uttering the phrases “I’ll put it together on stage,” “I kind of got it,” and “I get the jist of it” are surefire predictors that you will stumble through your presentation. It will come across sloppy, disorganized and unprofessional.

Make sure that when you deliver your presentation, you know the content so well you can teach it to another person. Because in a way, that’s exactly what you’re doing. Also, be ready for questions afterward.

Do Not Alienate Your Audience

In high school, our communications teacher took us (a class  of 16) to a Microsoft conference, where they were unveiling Active Directory. During the keynote, in a room with over 200 people, the first thing out of the speaker’s mouth was, “I know there are students in here right now and that’s great, but this presentation isn’t for you.”

Very Important

Know your audience! Speak their language, their tone and their energy level – communicate with them, not at them.

Dont Ignore Your Time

Go off on tangents, ignore your time and make sure to speak longer than for what you’ve been scheduled. This is one guaranteed way to disrespect the person/events following you and your audience who is waiting for you to finish. Unless, of course, everybody is on the edge of their seats hanging on to your every word. (*Hint – they will tell you to keep going if that’s the case)

The one way around this is to practice, practice, practice… out loud! It’s always perfect in your head, but reality comes a knocking when you practice out loud. Refine your presentation until it hits all your major points within your time limit. Your audience will love you for it.

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In fact, the guaranteed way to avoid many of these, is to practice at nausea. Practice walking on to the stage, saying your opening line and delivering the entire presentation. Get feedback from anybody who is willing to listen. Doing so will put you in a better class of presenters – one that people will want to sit through.

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Visualbee Compilation of Common Presentation Mistakes

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Presenters are beginning to realise that their presentations don’t have to be boring, and it is inspiring to see that people are moving away from bullet points to more engaging visuals. Audiences are now demanding more, and presenters are rising to meet this.

Thus presenters often design their slides to make sense on their own, expecting to just elaborate on them when in front of an audience. This idea has fuelled a whole range of presentation mishaps, which we’ve outlined below.

Mistake #1: Asking Your Audience to Read a Lot

Thankfully, this sort of slide is rare now. The worst visual aid is the one that’s not designed for a presentation, but as a document. The audience have come to listen to you – not to read. This sort of slide would be more useful when emailed as a document than projected onto a screen.

Enough complaints have been made about this practice now that there really is no excuse. The layout doesn’t matter – a lot of text is ineffective, whatever format it is in. And if you put text up but say something else – your audience will still read. And ignore you.

And aside from anything else – with that much text on screen, will they even be able to see it all properly?

Mistake #2: Bullet points

Do bullet points look exciting? Every presenter should know of the staleness of bullet points by now. There has been enough hype in the media, and enough books published, for the majority of people to understand that bullet points do not work. So why are audiences still subjected to this? Bullet points are not engaging.

The current craze is to remove the bullet points, placing each idea onto its own slide instead. While this is an improvement, it doesn’t matter where the bullets are – even if each point is on a separate slide, they are still bullet points.

Mistake #3: ClipArt

Thankfully, this has seen a dramatic downturn in popularity, but the fact that we managed to find even one example of this is reason enough to provide a reminder. ClipArt is tacky and awful, does not aid audience comprehension in any way, and will just leave them distinctly unimpressed.

Mistake #4: Tacky Stock Imagery

Does this really need an explanation? The picture looks unprofessional, and doesn’t aid the audience’s comprehension in any way. This isn’t the sort of picture you’d expect to see in the boardroom, or at a really good TED talk. In fact, this sort of image could really be considered as photograph ClipArt.

If you want to impress with your presentation, make sure that you use only the best visuals. Using humour is risky at the best of times, and this sort of silliness is unlikely to make a good impression.

Mistake #5: Complicated Diagrams

Aside from the awful colours and the bizarre text bubble in the background, there is far too much going on on this slide. Throw up something like this and your audience will give up before they’ve started. Complicated diagrams are difficult enough to digest when perusing them at one’s own leisure: when put up on a slide with a presenter talking over them, the audience has even less chance of comprehending. There’s just far too much information here to digest – is the presenter really asking the audience to acknowledge all of these data points?

Diagrams should be simple, and should build so that each point can be talked about as it appears on screen. Putting everything up at once just renders the audience unable to digest the information, and can leave them so overwhelmed that they disengage entirely

Mistake #6: Distracting Pictures

This type of slide demonstrates what some presenters refer to as ‘the visual metaphor’. A metaphor or comparison is selected, often a well-known cliché or conceit. This is then pictured in the form of an abstract visual, and an image is found that vaguely portrays this. The image is most often big. And beautiful. So beautiful in fact, that audiences would happily have it on their walls. So beautiful in fact, that they could stare at it for hours, happily drifting off into their own personal daydreams…

See the problem?

Unless your visual aids are strictly relevant to your message – don’t include them. Visuals can be more distracting than you think, and encouraging your audience to think about something else while they’re supposed to be listening to you is never a good idea.

Mistake #7: Explaining the Point

The presenter who uses this method has realised that visuals can be seriously distracting when used incorrectly. So in order to ensure that the audience focus on the message rather than on the pretty pictures, he outlines the point of the slide. Great. Can’t ignore that, can they?

Well, no. Which is the problem.

If you put text on a slide, the audience will read this instead of listening to you. No problem, the presenter replies. I’ve only put up one sentence. They can read it, and then come back to listening to me.

But why should they? As far as the audience is concerned, your slide completely explains the point. They don’t need to listen to you – they already ‘get it’. Unless your truly spectacular presenting skills can drag the audience’s attention back, they may disengage – because if the slide explains the point, the presenter’s role is defunct.

Conclusion

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So, when designing your next presentation, think about what will most help you to keep the audience engaged, whilst aiding their comprehension of your point. Think about each visual you choose: why are you using that particular slide? If it doesn’t help the audience grasp your point without distracting them – don’t use it.

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